God in Humanity – SDARM

The following article contains error on the nature of Christ.  The originals were found here which have since been removed:

http://www.sdarm.org/pub_data/rh%20back%20issues/pdf/rh209.pdf

http://www.sdarm.org/pub_data/rh%20back%20issues/pdf/rh309.pdf

http://www.sdarm.org/pub_data/rh%20back%20issues/pdf/rh409.pdf

Interspersed is a commentary in blue by Editor and Larry Kirkpatrick SDA minister:

The Word Was Made Flesh – God in Humanity – Part 1 – By Peter Lausevic – The Reformation Herald, Vol. 50 No 2

The understanding and receiving of the gospel comprise the power to save humanity.

“For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek” (Romans 1:16).

This gospel is a mystery that has been hidden since eternity.

“Now to him that is of power to stablish you according to my gospel, and the preaching of Jesus Christ, according to the revelation of the mystery, which was kept secret since the world began” (Romans 16:25).

“The plan for our redemption was not an afterthought, a plan formulated after the fall of Adam. It was a revelation of ‘the mystery which hath been kept in silence through times eternal’ (Romans 16:25, RV).

It was an unfolding of the principles that from eternal ages have been the foundation of God’s throne.” 1

This was kept secret. But since it is so important for our salvation, what has God done with it?

“But now is made manifest, and by the scriptures of the prophets, according to the commandment of the everlasting God, made known to all nations for the obedience of faith” (Romans 16:26).

The mystery of the gospel is the fact that God was manifest in the flesh.

“And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness: God was manifest in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen of angels, preached unto the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up into glory” (1 Timothy 3:16).

Yes, the eternal Word of God who created the universe became flesh.

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not anything made that was made. In him was life; and the life was the light of men. And the Word was made flesh, and . . . dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth” (John 1:1–4, 14).

He is the eternal Word.

“Man’s need for a divine teacher was known in heaven. The pity and sympathy of God were aroused in behalf of human beings, fallen and bound to Satan’s chariot car; and when the fullness of time was come, He sent forth His Son. The One appointed in the councils of heaven came to this earth as man’s instructor. The rich benevolence of God gave Him to our world, and to meet the necessities of human nature He took humanity upon Himself. To the astonishment of the heavenly host, the eternal Word came to this world as a helpless babe. Fully prepared, He left the royal courts and mysteriously allied Himself with fallen human beings. [John 1:14 quoted.]” 2

Why did the eternal Word need to come to us and be made flesh?

“Christ alone was able to represent the Deity. He who had been in the presence of the Father from the beginning, He who was the express image of the invisible God, was alone sufficient to accomplish this work. No verbal description could reveal God to the world.” 3

He became God with us to reveal God to us.

“Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us” (Matthew 1:23).

God prepared a body for Christ.

“Wherefore when he cometh into the world, he saith, Sacrifice and offering thou wouldest not, but a body hast thou prepared me” (Hebrews 10:5).

“Through a life of purity, a life of perfect trust and submission to the will of God, a life of humiliation such as even the highest seraph in heaven would have shrunk from, God Himself must be revealed to humanity. In order to do this, our Saviour clothed His divinity with humanity. He employed the human faculties, for only by adopting these could He be comprehended by humanity. Only humanity could reach humanity. He lived out the character of God through the human body which God had prepared for Him. He blessed the world by living out in human flesh the life of God, thus showing that He had the power to unite humanity to divinity.” 4

So, while upon earth, Christ was still God, for He was God with us. Christ received worship of the wise men, who inquired,

“Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him. . . . And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh” (Matthew 2:2, 11).

There are other examples of Christ receiving worship. Matthew 8:2; 9:18; 14:33; 15:25; 28:9, 17; Mark 5:6; Luke 24:52; John 9:38. When Christ healed someone, virtue came out of Him.

“And Jesus said, Somebody hath touched me: for I perceive that virtue is gone out of me” (Luke 8:46; see also 6:19).

The word translated here as “virtue” is the Greek word dunamis, meaning “strength,” “power,” “ability.” It refers especially to inherent power, power residing in a thing by virtue of its nature, or which a person or thing exerts and puts forth. It is power for performing miracles, moral power and excellence of soul. Jesus could read people’s minds.

“And Jesus knew their thoughts, and said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand” (Matthew 12:25; see also Luke 6:8).

This was not simply a normal process through the Holy Spirit revealing it, but it was actually an evidence of His divinity.

“Jesus now gave the people of Nazareth an evidence of His divinity by revealing their secret thoughts.” 5

Christ actually forgave sins and had power to do so while on earth.

“When [Jesus] saw their faith, he said unto him, Man, thy sins are forgiven thee. And the scribes and the Pharisees began to reason, saying, Who is this which speaketh blasphemies? Who can forgive sins, but God alone? But when Jesus perceived their thoughts, he answering said unto them, What reason ye in your hearts? Whether is easier, to say, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Rise up and walk? But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power upon earth to forgive sins, (he said unto the sick of the palsy,) I say unto thee, Arise, and take up thy couch, and go into thine house” (Luke 5:20-24).

Jesus could even send a divine “telegraphic-style” message to heal someone.

“The nobleman saith unto him, Sir, come down ere my child die. Jesus saith unto him, Go thy way; thy son liveth. And the man believed the word that Jesus had spoken unto him, and he went his way. And as he was now going down, his servants met him, and told him, saying, Thy son liveth. Then enquired he of them the hour when he began to amend. And they said unto him, Yesterday at the seventh hour the fever left him. So the father knew that it was at the same hour, in the which Jesus said unto him, Thy son liveth: and himself believed, and his whole house” (John 4:49–53).

“Jesus responds to the demands of the centurion by commanding him, ‘Go thy way; thy son liveth.’ These brief and simple words thrill through the heart of the father; he feels the holy power of the speaker in every tone. Instead of going to Capernaum, Jesus, by a flash of divine telegraphy, sends the message of healing to the bedside of the suffering son. He dismisses the suppliant, who, with unspeakable gratitude and perfect faith in the words of the Saviour, turns his steps homeward with a peace and joy he has never felt before.” 6

Jesus could read people’s life histories.

“Jesus now abruptly changed the subject of conversation, and bade [the Samaritan woman] call her husband. The woman answered frankly that she had no husband. Jesus had now approached the desired point where he could convince her that he had the power to read her life history, although previously unacquainted with her. He addressed her thus: ‘Thou hast well said, I have no husband; for thou hast had five husbands; and he whom thou now hast is not thy husband; in that saidst thou truly’ (John 4:17, 18).” 7

References 1 The Desire of Ages, p. 22. 2 Counsels to Parents, Teachers, and Students, p. 259. 3 The Review and Herald, June 25, 1895. 4 Ibid. 5 The Desire of Ages, p. 238. 6 The Spirit of Prophecy, vol. 2, pp. 154, 155.

In the Likeness of Sinful Flesh

Part 2 – By Peter Lausevic – The Reformation Herald, Vol. 50, No. 3 – 

In the likeness of sinful flesh Prophecy declares that the birth of Jesus would be unique. Indeed, it would be a miracle.

“Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel” (Isaiah 7:14).

This miracle was explained to Mary prior to the time of conception.

“And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God” (Luke 1:35).

“The angel of the Lord appeared unto [Joseph] in a dream, saying, Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife: for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost” (Matthew 1:20).

The psalmist prophesied of the Messiah’s experience:

“Thou art he that took me out of the womb: thou didst make me hope when I was upon my mother’s breasts. I was cast upon thee from the womb: thou art my God from my mother’s belly” (Psalm 22:9, 10).

In reality, Jesus was a contradiction of terms.

“Jesus loved His brothers, and treated them with unfailing kindness; but they were jealous of Him, and manifested the most decided unbelief and contempt. They could not understand His conduct. Great contradictions presented themselves in Jesus. He was the divine Son of God, and yet a helpless child. The Creator of the worlds, the earth was His possession, and yet poverty marked His life experience at every step.” 1

In order to save humanity from the penalty of sin, it was necessary that One equal with God should taste death for every human being.

“Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God” (Philippians 2:5, 6).

“We see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man” (Hebrews 2:9). In order for this salvation to be possible, Jesus had to be made in the likeness of humans. He “made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men” (Philippians 2:7).

“It became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings” (Hebrews 2:10).

“Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people” (verse 17).

The word translated as “behoved” often is used in reference to a debt owed. From this we can see that it was required of Christ to partake of our flesh and blood, to partake of our human nature in order to be our High Priest.

“For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succour them that are tempted” (verse 18). “For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need” (Hebrews 4:15, 16).

He had to partake of flesh and blood in reality.

“Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil; and deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage” (Hebrews 2:14, 15).

He had to be of the seed of Abraham.

“For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham” (verse 16).

He was of the seed of David as well.

“Remember that Jesus Christ of the seed of David was raised from the dead according to my gospel” (2 Timothy 2:8).

“Think of Christ’s humiliation. He took upon Himself fallen, suffering human nature, degraded and defiled by sin. He took our sorrows, bearing our grief and shame. He endured all the temptations wherewith man is beset. He united humanity with divinity: a divine spirit dwelt in a temple of flesh. He united Himself with the temple. ‘The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us’ (John 1:14), because by so doing He could associate with the sinful, sorrowing sons and daughters of Adam.” 2

What did the plan of salvation require? Since the law could not save us on its own (as it only condemns), what did God have to do in order to bring salvation to humanity?

“And being found in fashion as a man, [Christ Jesus] humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross” (Philippians 2:8).

This was impossible in the law itself. “For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh” (Romans 8:3).

Jesus identifies Himself with humanity. This is revealed in His prophecy of the final judgment hour:

“Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world: For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in: Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me” (Matthew 25:34–36).

“Christ is our example; He identified Himself with suffering humanity; He made the necessities of others a consideration of His own. When His brethren suffered, He suffered with them. Any slight or neglect of His disciples is the same as if done to Christ Himself.” 3

“To redeem man, Christ became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. The humanity of the Son of God is everything to us. It is the golden linked chain which binds our souls to Christ and through Christ to God. This is to be our study. Christ was a real man, and He gave proof of His humility in becoming a man. And He was God in the flesh.” 4

“Jesus declared, ‘I am the resurrection, and the life’ (John 11:25). In Christ is life, original, unborrowed, underived. ‘He that hath the Son hath life’ (1 John 5:12). The divinity of Christ is the believer’s assurance of eternal life.” 5

The awesome mystery “The work of redemption is called a mystery, and it is indeed the mystery by which everlasting righteousness is brought to all who believe. In consequence of sin, the race was at enmity with God. At an infinite cost and by a process mysterious to angels as well as to men, Christ assumed humanity. Hiding His divinity, laying aside His glory, He was born a babe in Bethlehem. In human flesh He lived the law of God that He might condemn sin in the flesh, and witness to heavenly intelligences that the law was ordained to life, to ensure the happiness, peace, and eternal good of all who obey. But the same infinite sacrifice that is life to those who believe is a testimony of condemnation to the disobedient, speaking death and not life.” 6

“Christ saw man’s fearful danger, and He determined to save him by the sacrifice of Himself. That He might accomplish His purpose of love for the fallen race, He became bone of our bone and flesh of our flesh.” 7

“Sin-burdened, struggling souls, Jesus in His glorified humanity has ascended into the heavens to make intercession for us. ‘For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace’ (Hebrews 4:15, 16). We should be continually looking unto Jesus, the Author and Finisher of our faith; for by beholding Him we shall be changed into His image, our character will be made like His. We should rejoice that all judgment is given to the Son, because in His humanity He has become acquainted with all the difficulties that beset humanity.” 8

“When in the fullness of time the Son of the infinite God came forth from the bosom of the Father to this world, He came in the garb of humanity, clothing His divinity with humanity. The Father and the Son in consultation decided that Christ must come to the world as a babe, and live the life that human beings must live from childhood to manhood, bearing the trials that they must bear, and at the same time living a sinless life, that men might see in Him an example of what they can become, and that He might know by experience how to help them in their struggles with sin. He was tried as man is tried, tempted as man is tempted. The life that He lived in this world, men can live, through His power and under His instruction.” 9

This was after 4,000 years of sin.

“The story of Bethlehem is an exhaustless theme. In it is hidden ‘the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God’ (Romans 11:33). We marvel at the Saviour’s sacrifice in exchanging the throne of heaven for the manger, and the companionship of adoring angels for the beasts of the stall. Human pride and self-sufficiency stand rebuked in His presence. Yet this was but the beginning of His wonderful condescension. It would have been an almost infinite humiliation for the Son of God to take man’s nature, even when Adam stood in his innocence in Eden. But Jesus accepted humanity when the race had been weakened by four thousand years of sin. Like every child of Adam He accepted the results of the working of the great law of heredity. What these results were is shown in the history of His earthly ancestors. He came with such a heredity to share our sorrows and temptations, and to give us the example of a sinless life.” 10

Christ redeemed us in that fallen nature of Adam after the Fall.

“Satan had pointed to Adam’s sin as proof that God’s law was unjust and could not be obeyed. In our humanity, Christ was to redeem Adam’s failure. But when Adam was assailed by the tempter, none of the effects of sin were upon him. He stood in the strength of perfect manhood, possessing the full vigor of mind and body. He was surrounded with the glories of Eden, and was in daily communion with heavenly beings. It was not thus with Jesus when He entered the wilderness to cope with Satan. For four thousand years the race had been decreasing in physical strength, in mental power, and in moral worth; and Christ took upon Him the infirmities of degenerate humanity. Only thus could He rescue man from the lowest depths of his degradation.” 11

“The Lord now demands that every son and daughter of Adam, through faith in Jesus Christ, serve Him in human nature which we now have. The Lord Jesus has bridged the gulf that sin has made. He has connected earth with heaven, and fi nite man with the infinite God. Jesus, the world’s Redeemer, could only keep the commandments of God in the same way that humanity can keep them.” 12

To what extent will God save?

“But this man, because he continueth ever, hath an unchangeable priesthood. Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them” (Hebrews 7:24, 25).

References 1 The Desire of Ages, pp. 87, 88. 2 The SDA Bible Commentary [E. G. White Comments], vol. 4, p. 1147. 3 Testimonies, vol. 4, p. 63. 4 The SDA Bible Commentary [E. G. White Comments], vol. 7, p. 904. 5 The Desire of Ages, p. 530. 6 The Youth’s Instructor, July 20, 1899. 7 The Signs of the Times, September 4, 1902. 8 Reflecting Christ, p. 20. 9 The Signs of the Times, May 17, 1905. 10 The Desire of Ages, pp. 48, 49. 11 Ibid., p. 117. 12 The SDA Bible Commentary [E. G. White Comments], vol. 7, p. 929.

THE WORD WAS MADE FLESH  Part 3 By Peter D Lausevic The Reformation Herald, Vol. 50, No. 4 

Were there inclinations to sin in Jesus? 

That which was born to Mary was called “that holy thing.

“The angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God.” (Luke 1:35).

Whatever we conclude about Jesus, we must always remember that He was “that holy thing.” When He came into this world to save us to the uttermost, He was still holy and that is why He can be our High Priest.

“This man, because he continueth ever, hath an unchangeable priesthood. Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them. For such an high priest became us, who is holy, harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, and made higher than the heavens; who needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people’s: for this he did once, when he offered up himself.” (Hebrews 7:24–27).

For that reason, the body that was given Him (Hebrews 10:5) was free from physical deformity. That is why we are redeemed by an incorruptible lamb, without blemish or spot. “Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, from your vain conversation received by tradition from your fathers; but with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot. (1 Peter 1:18, 19).

“The offerings presented to the Lord were to be without blemish. These offerings represented Christ, and from this it is evident that Jesus Himself was free from physical deformity. He was the ‘lamb without blemish and without spot’ (1 Peter 1:19). His physical structure was not marred by any defect; His body was strong and healthy. And throughout His lifetime He lived in conformity to nature’s laws. Physically as well as spiritually, He was an example of what God designed all humanity to be through obedience to His laws.”1

Christ’s physical body was far superior to our own.

“[Satan], who could take up the Son of God, who was made a little lower than the angels, and place Him upon a pinnacle of the temple, and take Him up into an exceeding high mountain to present before Him the kingdoms of the world, can exercise his power upon the human family, who are far inferior in strength and wisdom to the Son of God, even after He had taken upon Himself man’s nature.”2

[The above statement has been used out of context. If you read the context you will understand that the human family referred to here are the benighted, disadvantaged, unfortunate, unenlightened, ignorant souls who are spoken of in the article. Those who are relying on the powers of their body without their head. Jesus was superior to that because in his flesh as weak as ours, his human nature empowered by his knowledge of his flesh and reliance on strength from heaven.] Larry Kirkpatrick

Here is the full statement;

With due attention to the word of God, all may be convinced if they will of this soul-destroying delusion. That word declares in positive terms that “the dead know not anything.” Ecclesiastes 9:5, 6: “For the living know that they shall die; but the dead know not anything, neither have they any more a reward; for the memory of them is forgotten. Also their love, and their hatred, and their envy, is now perished; neither have they any more a portion forever in anything that is done under the sun.” The word of God expressly declares that the dead have no more a portion in anything that is done under the sun. Spiritualists say that the dead know everything that is done; that they communicate to their friends on earth, give valuable information, and perform wonders. “The dead praise not the Lord, neither any that go down into silence.” Satan, transformed into an angel of light, works with all deceivableness of unrighteousness. He who could take up the Son of God, and place him upon a pinnacle of the temple, and again could take him up into an exceeding high mountain, and present before him the kingdoms of the world, can exercise his power upon the human family, who are far inferior in strength and wisdom to Jesus, even after he had taken upon himself man’s nature. {ST, November 13, 1884 par. 4}

“Intruding into those things which he hath not seen, vainly puffed up by his fleshly mind,” says the apostle. Some tamper with Spiritualism to gratify their curiosity. They have no real faith in it, and would start back with horror at the thought of being mediums; yet they place themselves in a position where Satan can exercise his power upon them. They do not mean to enter deep into this work; but they know not what they are doing. They are venturing upon forbidden ground; and the mighty destroyer considers them his lawful prey, and exercises his power upon them against their will. They have yielded their mind to his control, and he holds them captives. Nothing can deliver these ensnared souls but the power of God in answer to the earnest prayers of his faithful followers. {ST, November 13, 1884 par. 5}

Since Jesus has a superior character, He was tempted to a greater degree than any mortal.

“Many look on this conflict between Christ and Satan as having no special bearing on their own life; and for them it has little interest. But within the domain of every human heart this controversy is repeated. Never does one leave the ranks of evil for the service of God without encountering the assaults of Satan. The enticements which Christ resisted were those that we find it so difficult to withstand. They were urged upon Him in as much greater degree as His character is superior to ours. With the terrible weight of the sins of the world upon Him, Christ withstood the test upon appetite, upon the love of the world, and upon that love of display which leads to presumption. These were the temptations that overcame Adam and Eve, and that so readily overcome us.”3

“It is impossible for man to know the strength of Satan’s temptations to the Son of God. Every temptation that seems so afflicting to man in his daily life, so difficult to resist and overcome, was brought to bear upon the Son of God in as much greater degree as his excellence of character was superior to that of fallen man.”4

Can this be said of any of us who are born in this world? Jesus lived the life of a sinless Saviour.

“He made His grave with the wicked, and with the rich in His death; because He had done no violence, neither was any deceit in His mouth. (Isaiah 53:9).

“For our transgressions are multiplied before thee, and our sins testify against us: for our transgressions are with us; and as for our iniquities, we know them.” (Isaiah 53:12).

We are redeemed “with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot. . . . For even hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps: who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth. (1 Peter 1:19; 2:21, 22).

Christ bore our sins but not our sinfulness.

[The Bible says he was made to be sin for us – 2 Corinthians 5:21 For he hath made him [to be] sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.]

“He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the Lord hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. . . . He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities.” (Isaiah 53:3–6, 11).

Christ bore our sins, not only at Calvary but already in the wilderness of temptation.

“When [Jesus’] ministry commenced, after His baptism, He endured an agonizing fast of nearly six weeks. It was not merely the gnawing pangs of hunger which made His sufferings inexpressibly severe, but it was the guilt of the sins of the world which pressed so heavily upon Him. He who knew no sin was made sin for us. With this terrible weight of guilt upon Him because of our sins He withstood the fearful test upon appetite, and upon love of the world and of honor, and pride of display which leads to presumption. “5

Christ took upon Himself our sinful nature.

“He took upon His sinless nature our sinful nature, that He might know how to succor those that are tempted.”6

But He did not take our sinfulness.

[Ellen White says:

“Coming as He did, as a man, to meet and be subjected to, with all the evil tendencies to which man is heir, working in every conceivable manner to destroy His faith, He made it possible for Himself to be buffeted by human agencies inspired by Satan.” Letter K-303, 1903, quoted in Adventist Review 17 February 1994]

“The Son of God in His humanity wrestled with the very same fierce, apparently overwhelming temptations that assail men–temptations to indulgence of appetite, to presumptuous venturing where God has not led them, and to the worship of the god of this world, to sacrifice an eternity of bliss for the fascinating pleasures of this life.” 1 SM 95

“He knows how strong are the inclinations of the natural heart.” 5T 177

“He knows by experience what are the weaknesses of humanity, what are our wants, and where lies the strength of our temptations.” MH 71

“In Gethsemane ‘His depression and discouragement left Him.” DA 694

“Christ did in reality unite the offending nature of man with His own sinless nature.” RH 17 July 1900

“He had not taken on Him even the nature of angels, but humanity, perfectly identical with our own nature, except without the taint of sin. . . . He had reason, conscience, memory, will, and affections of the human soul which was united with His divine nature.” 16 MR 181. (Compare to 3SM 130, ‘We have reason, conscience, memory, will, affections–all the attributes a human being can possess.’)

“Adam and Eve were given a probation in which to return to their allegiance; and in this plan of benevolence all their posterity were embraced. After the Fall, Christ became Adam’s instructor. He acted in God’s stead toward humanity, saving the race from immediate death. He took upon Him the work of mediator between God and man. In the fullness of time He was to be revealed in human form. He was to take His position at the head of humanity by taking the nature but not the sinfulness of man.”7

When Jesus partook of our flesh, He possessed like infirmities but not our passions.

[Ellen White says:

“Though He had all the strength of passion of humanity, never did He yield to temptation to do one single act which was not pure and elevating and ennobling.” HP 155]

“The Majesty of heaven, while engaged in His mission, was often in earnest prayer. He did not always visit Olivet, for His disciples had learned His favorite retreat and often followed Him. He chose the stillness of night, when there would be no interruption. Jesus could heal the sick and raise the dead. He was Himself a source of blessing and strength. He commanded even the tempests, and they obeyed Him. He was unsullied with corruption, a stranger to sin; yet He prayed, and that often with strong crying and tears. He prayed for His disciples and for Himself, thus identifying Himself with our needs, our weaknesses, and our failings, which are so common with humanity. He was a mighty petitioner, not possessing the passions of our human, fallen natures, but compassed with like infirmities, tempted in all points even as we are. Jesus endured agony which required help and support from His Father.”8

“Jesus Himself, while He dwelt among men, was often in prayer. Our Saviour identified Himself with our needs and weakness, in that He became a suppliant, a petitioner, seeking from His Father fresh supplies of strength, that He might come forth braced for duty and trial. He is our example in all things. He is a brother in our infirmities, ‘in all points tempted like as we are;’ but as the sinless one His nature recoiled from evil; He endured struggles and torture of soul in a world of sin. His humanity made prayer a necessity and a privilege. He found comfort and joy in communion with His Father. And if the Saviour of men, the Son of God, felt the need of prayer, how much more should feeble, sinful mortals feel the necessity of fervent, constant prayer.”9

“As the human was upon Him, He felt His need of strength from His Father. He had select places of prayer. He loved to hold communion with His Father in the solitude of the mountain. In this exercise His holy, human soul was strengthened for the duties and trials of the day. Our Saviour identifies Himself with our needs and weaknesses, in that He became a suppliant, a nightly petitioner, seeking from His Father fresh supplies of strength, to come forth invigorated and refreshed, braced for duty and trial. He is our example in all things. He is a brother in our infirmities, but not in possessing like passions. As the sinless One, His nature recoiled from evil. He endured struggles and torture of soul in a world of sin. His humanity made prayer a necessity and privilege. He required all the stronger divine support and comfort which His Father was ready to impart to Him, to Him who had, for the benefit of man, left the joys of heaven and chosen His home in a cold and thankless world. Christ found comfort and joy in communion with His Father. Here He could unburden His heart of the sorrows that were crushing Him. He was a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief.”10

When Christ took our frailties, He healed the sick, but He never became sick by taking on our infirmities.

“When the even was come, they brought unto him many that were possessed with devils: and he cast out the spirits with his word, and healed all that were sick: That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses.” (Matthew 8:16, 17).

“The work of Christ in cleansing the leper from his terrible disease is an illustration of His work in cleansing the soul from sin. The man who came to Jesus was ‘full of leprosy.’ Its deadly poison permeated his whole body. The disciples sought to prevent their Master from touching him; for he who touched a leper became himself unclean. But in laying His hand upon the leper, Jesus received no defilement. His touch imparted life-giving power. The leprosy was cleansed. Thus it is with the leprosy of sin—deep-rooted, deadly, and impossible to be cleansed by human power. ‘The whole head is sick, and the whole heart faint. From the sole of the foot even unto the head there is no soundness in it; but wounds, and bruises, and putrefying sores’ (Isaiah 1:5, 6). But Jesus, coming to dwell in humanity, receives no pollution. His presence has healing virtue for the sinner. Whoever will fall at His feet, sinner. Whoever will fall at His feet, saying in faith, ‘Lord, if Thou wilt, Thou canst make me clean,’ shall hear the answer, ‘I will; be thou made clean’. (Matthew 8:2, 3, RV)”.11

References 1 The Desire of Ages, pp. 50, 51. 2 Testimonies, vol. 1, p. 299. 3 The Desire of Ages, pp. 116, 117. 4 Confrontation, p. 31. 5 Testimonies, vol. 3, p. 372. 6 Medical Ministry, p. 181. 7 The SDA Bible Commentary [E. G. White Comments], vol. 7, p. 912. 8 Testimonies, vol. 2, pp. 508, 509. 9 Steps to Christ, pp. 93, 94. 10 Testimonies, vol. 2, pp. 201, 202.11 The Desire of Ages, p. 266. “He is a brother in our infirmities, but not in possessing like passions. As the sinless One, His nature recoiled from evil.” 6

Larry Kirkpatrick Adventist pastor comments on the the following video also by Peter Lausevic:

You will note the way he portrays Christ is indeed the spirit of the anti-Christ. In fact, if you listen to his sermon here 38 minutes in, hear how he interprets 1 John 4.

1 John 4:3 And every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God: and this is that [spirit] of antichrist, whereof ye have heard that it should come; and even now already is it in the world.

He gives a poor explanation saying we have to believe Jesus in his flesh as present tense.

Ellen White says:

You can go to the tempted and outcast with that, and assure them that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh, and that every sin that they have committed, and even the sinful nature which led them into those sins, he takes upon himself, and identifies himself with it, assuming all the responsibility for the uncommitted, with the life which has been perverted. {October 31, 1895 EJW, SITI 688.1}

It means to confess that Jesus Christ has come in our flesh. That is just how we are to overcome, – by Jesus Christ in our flesh, as the text says:

Greater is He that is in you than he that is in the world. {January 29, 1893 N/A, GCDB 34.2}

So it is that “every spirit that confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is of God; and every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God.” 1 John iv. 2, 3. Note again the present tense. It is not enough to confess that Jesus Christ did come in the flesh; that will bring no salvation to anybody. We must confess from positive knowledge, that Jesus is just now come in the flesh, and then we are of God. Christ came in the flesh eighteen hundred years ago, just for the purpose of demonstrating the possibility. That which He did once, He is able to do again. He who denies the possibility of His coming in the flesh of men now, thereby denies the possibility of His having ever come in the flesh. {May 18, 1893 EJW, PTUK 143.9}

What, then, could show a more universal reign of the form of godliness, not only without the power, but denying the power? For this form of godliness will deny that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh. Every spirit that confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh, that is the Spirit of God. Every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come, – not that he did come, but now is come in my flesh, – Christ in you the hope of glory, Christ abiding within, God reigning in the kingdom of God that is within you, – that is what this signifies. Every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God. And this is that spirit of antichrist. And ye have overcome them, little children, because greater is he that is in you, in you, in you, than he that is in the world. Who is it that is in the world? Oh, it is the god of this world; it is Satan. Greater is he – Christ – that is in you, than he that is in the world. {February 13, 1895 N/A, GCB 132.6}

Every spirit that confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh, that is the Spirit of God. Every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come, – not that he did come, but now is come in my flesh, – Christ in you the hope of glory, Christ abiding within, God reigning in the kingdom of God that is within you, – that is what this signifies. . {February 13, 1895 N/A, GCB 132.6}

“Every spirit that confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is of God; and every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God.” 1 John iv. 2, 3. It is not enough to confess that Jesus Christ once came in the flesh; we must confess that He even now is come in the flesh, even ours, and that He is “the same yesterday, and to-day, and for ever” (Heb. xiii. 8), and that therefore His life in us must be the same that it was in Him eighteen hundred years ago in Judea and Galilee. {May 7, 1903 EJW, PTUK 293.1}

“O the blessedness of the fact that “God hath made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.” 2 Cor. 5:21. Tempted, and suffering as no man ever has suffered in the flesh for sin, he knew no sin. Again and again he said that of himself he could do nothing, but he trusted God and when we read that His son Christ came and took all the weaknesses of sinful flesh, we also read that these weaknesses too manifested themselves in his life. Therefore, also, from the heart we confess the fact which the Scripture tells us, that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh even now, and even in us, because we are in the flesh, the recognition of that brings also the comfort with it, that in him was no sin while in the flesh, therefore his life, while we confess it, cleanses us from sin. E. J. W. {October 31, 1895 EJW, SITI 688.1}

Christ is come in the flesh, is of God; and every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God.” 1 John iv. 2, 3. Moreover, “whosoever believeth that Jesus is the Christ, is born of God;” “and whosoever is born of God sinneth not.” 1 John v. 1, 18. By putting these statements together, and thinking carefully over them, we may see that every sin that we commit is a denial that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh,-a denial that He is the Son of God,-and therefore that it marks us as liars. {July 18, 1901 EJW, PTUK 452.9}

The children of men are partakers of flesh and blood, and because of this He took part of the same. {1905 ATJ, CWCP 23.1}

But this is not all. He also took part of the same flesh and blood as that of which the children are partakers. {1905 ATJ, CWCP 23.2}

Nor is this all. He also Himself took part of the same flesh and blood as that of which the children of men are partakers. {1905 ATJ, CWCP 23.3}

Nor yet is this all. He also Himself likewise took part of the same flesh and blood as that of which men are partakers. {1905 ATJ, CWCP 23.4}

Thus the Spirit of inspiration so much desires that this truth shall be made so plain and emphatic as to be understood by all, that He is not content to use any fewer than all the words that could be used that just as, and just as certainly as, “the children are partakers of flesh and blood, He also Himself likewise took part of the same” flesh and blood. {1905 ATJ, CWCP 23.5}

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